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Gareth Southgate: Getting England job is just the start for me

Gareth Southgate: Getting England job is just the start for me
By PA Sport

01/12/2016 at 15:17Updated 01/12/2016 at 15:22

Gareth Southgate was unequivocal when asked where he wanted to be when his initial four-year contract as England manager comes to an end.

The 46-year-old was appointed as the Three Lions head coach on a permanent deal on Wednesday, having taken the reins on an interim basis for the previous four games.

He was labelled a "tough negotiator" by Martin Glenn, chief executive of the Football Association, after his deal did not come with the expected break clause to cover the possibility of a poor showing at the 2018 World Cup in Russia.

And now the former Under-21 boss is looking to bring the excitement back to the national team, while blooding the players from the younger ranks he already knows so much about.

He spoke to the media from the bowels of Wembley Stadium as he was unveiled as Sam Allardyce's successor on Thursday and when he was asked where he wanted to be in four years, his answer was that he did not want to go far at all - geographically, at least.

"I hope where we are sitting now," he replied.

"There is a (Euro 2020) semi-final and final at Wembley and if we are sitting very close to where we are now we will be pretty pleased I'm sure.

"There are great expectations which come with this job, and I look forward to embracing that and taking on this challenge.

"It's an honour and a great challenge, but the hard work starts now to be successful in the job over the next few years.

"I'm very proud and excited to be in the role but getting the job isn't the destination for me, making a success of the team is the key.

"I'd like an England team who excite the public, that supporters look forward to watching. And ultimately that they're proud of. If we achieve those things, we'll be on the right course."

Southgate has been labelled an 'FA man' in some quarters, having worked in their framework for a number of years, and the organisation want to see him bring through not only young talent but a fresh way of playing the game on the national stage.

To do that, there was no break clause inserted in his deal and he was keen to explain why he felt it was important he was given an initial four-year stint.

"There's no break clause," Southgate revealed.

"It's important that I want to be successful in this role. I'm taking over at a point where our last two tournaments have not been as successful as we'd have liked.

"There's potential in the squad, but a lot of hard work ahead. We have to qualify for Russia but we have 70 days to prepare the team between now and then and get to the level we want.

"We have a great group of players who are going to develop a lot, so we're looking not just short-term but also long-term."

Glenn also gave the FA's reasoning behind not seemingly giving themselves an exit strategy should Southgate's appointment turn sour - especially after they shelled out a reported £1million compensation fee to Allardyce after just one game in the job.

"It was the right negotiation," he told BBC Radio 5 Live.

"You start off with what is the right thing to do and this is a project where we think we can improve in every tournament we play in but we want to build for the long term.

"Logically you offer a long-term contract, you could have got someone in to just do a job for us in Russia but that is not what we need.

"Having an eye on the development of the younger players coming through and the talent identification that Gareth can see, that is what we need. That needs a longer contract than normal."

And Glenn went on to say he hopes Southgate can take even more money out of the coffers by proving to be a hit in the job.

Asked if the four-year deal was incentivised, he replied: "Absolutely, we have got the same mechanism, whereby Gareth would be rewarded handsomely for winning the World Cup and the Euros.

"That is normal and should stay in place and we would like very much to pay out to the maximum!"

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